Greenwich Village Guide

Greenwich Village

is known for its winding narrow streets, beautiful brownstones, and inspiring creative scene. The neighborhood has been the center of New York City’s artistic pulse for nearly a century. In its early days in the era of the American Revolution, Greenwich Village was a high-end neighborhood for wealthy residents. Over time, rent drastically decreased, and Greenwich Village became known for its tenement housing.

 

In the early 20th century, the neighborhood’s then-affordable housing began to attract artists and creatives. Vaudeville performers, dancers, musicians, playwrights, and actors, and writers thrived in the neighborhood; and by the ‘60s, it was the center of New York City counterculture. Famous creatives like Cole Porter, Andy Warhol, Mark Rothko, Jackson Pollock, Lou Reed, Bob Dylan, Joan Baez, and many others collaborated there.

 

While Greenwich Village’s culture has shifted in the decades since, the music, art, and theater scenes are still active highlights of the neighborhood.

 

The Village also served as a backdrop to some of the most important strides in the US LGBT rights movement. The Stonewall Inn, a bustling LGBT bar which still stands today, was the site of a series of 1969 demonstrations that were some of the major catalysts in the modern LGBT rights movement.

 

As time went on, Greenwich Village’s exciting energy made it more attractive to wealthy renters. Rents have risen dramatically, and today, it’s one of the most desirable neighborhoods in Manhattan. The modern Greenwich Village is home to quaint boutiques, beautiful townhouses, and leafy historic blocks. There is still a vibe of creativity in the air, with off-Broadway performance spaces, music venues, and independent film theaters. The nearby New York University campus also infuses a creative and youthful atmosphere into the neighborhood.

 

What To See In Greenwich Village

  • Washington Square Park
  • The Blue Note Jazz Club
  • The Stonewall Inn
  • The Restaurant Scene
  • The NYC Pride Parade (held in the Village each June)
  • Local Boutiques
  • Charming Side Streets
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Greenwich Village

is known for its winding narrow streets, beautiful brownstones, and inspiring creative scene. The neighborhood has been the center of New York City’s artistic pulse for nearly a century. In its early days in the era of the American Revolution, Greenwich Village was a high-end neighborhood for wealthy residents. Over time, rent drastically decreased, and Greenwich Village became known for its tenement housing.

 

In the early 20th century, the neighborhood’s then-affordable housing began to attract artists and creatives. Vaudeville performers, dancers, musicians, playwrights, and actors, and writers thrived in the neighborhood; and by the ‘60s, it was the center of New York City counterculture. Famous creatives like Cole Porter, Andy Warhol, Mark Rothko, Jackson Pollock, Lou Reed, Bob Dylan, Joan Baez, and many others collaborated there.

 

While Greenwich Village’s culture has shifted in the decades since, the music, art, and theater scenes are still active highlights of the neighborhood.

 

The Village also served as a backdrop to some of the most important strides in the US LGBT rights movement. The Stonewall Inn, a bustling LGBT bar which still stands today, was the site of a series of 1969 demonstrations that were some of the major catalysts in the modern LGBT rights movement.

 

As time went on, Greenwich Village’s exciting energy made it more attractive to wealthy renters. Rents have risen dramatically, and today, it’s one of the most desirable neighborhoods in Manhattan. The modern Greenwich Village is home to quaint boutiques, beautiful townhouses, and leafy historic blocks. There is still a vibe of creativity in the air, with off-Broadway performance spaces, music venues, and independent film theaters. The nearby New York University campus also infuses a creative and youthful atmosphere into the neighborhood.

 

What To See In Greenwich Village

  • Washington Square Park
  • The Blue Note Jazz Club
  • The Stonewall Inn
  • The Restaurant Scene
  • The NYC Pride Parade (held in the Village each June)
  • Local Boutiques
  • Charming Side Streets

BUY A TOURIST PASS